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Please deport me too

Victor Mochere

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Please deport me too

I was born in Kenya, I don’t know how many moons have passed since then, but I guess quite a number. That makes me a Kenyan, by birth, at least I thought that was the case until they decided to deport Miguna Miguna, not once but twice. Dragging, harassing, torturing and even drugging just to get rid of him like a dog gone rogue. Maybe I misread the constitution, can’t claim that am a good reader. In the course of the two or so decades that I have been a tenant of this country, the only motherland that I have known, the only home that my parents gave me, I have never ever heard of a government that claims to be elected by people, for the people, deporting its own citizens. Maybe my naivety has taken precedent, maybe respect for the constitution and laws governing the country is better said than done. I’m not defending or criticizing anyone. Just got to think of it, now that deportation is the order of the day in a third world country ranked among the most corrupt poorest countries in the world, maybe deportation is what we all need. So please deport me too, but to a country where:

 

1. Court orders are obeyed and respected

The government has been crashing with the judiciary about respect for court orders, no one is above the law, it ought and should cut across. In a country where court orders are only implemented if they favour the government otherwise the judiciary and its officers get criticized, abused and threatened. For instance, after the Supreme Court nullifying the 2017 presidential election, what we witnessed is so unbearable and uncalled for. Also in the case of the Miguna Miguna, where we have seen court orders being treated like pieces of paper. What happened to the doctrine of separation of power, the independence of institutions, the legislature enacts the laws, the judiciary interprets them and the executive implements them. When did the rain start beating us? Up to the point that Chief Justice David Maraga came out to give a statement on respect of court orders. Really?

 

2. Police brutality is not tolerated

The work of police officers is to protect the citizens of a country while at the same time abiding by the laws without jeopardizing the human rights of the people. Of late we have seen the police force being used as puppets by the executive, to settle scores with the opposition and those who try to stand against it. Police maiming, torturing, clobbering, brutalizing and killing Kenyans has become the order of the day. And the irony is that the government instead to taking disciplinary measures against the police personnel who go astray, it ends up praising and encouraging them. We are at the mercy of angry untamed police. What a country!

 

3. Media houses and journalists have freedom

Over the ages, media houses have been a platform used to inform and educate people, therefore acting as a source of information to the uninformed. Media freedom has never been fully earned despite spending decades fighting for it. They have been intimidated by the government of the day to report only issues that are favourable to it. Journalists who risk their lives to bring fort a story have been gagged, tortured and had their equipments confiscated, so as to be bowed away from reporting stories that might taint the credibility of the government. Then how are we supposed to stay informed? A country that does not respect the role of media is just a a failed nation on its deathbed. The government is thriving, or should I say destroying the country, by inspiring fear to the members of the 4th estate. Lest we forget the attack on Standard Media Group in 2006 and most recently how journalists were treated when covering the return of Miguna Miguna. Journalists are exiting in search of greener and safer pastures at International Media Houses due to unfavourable working conditions here at home.

 

4. Freedom of expression exists

During the Moi regime freedom of speech and expression was totally a vocabulary but as we ushered in the Kibaki era we saw the rise of human right groups, activism and a rise of a new generation of bloggers, all of whom determined to use any channel at their disposal to air out their voices. Something that was enhanced with the invention of social media. But the joy has been short lived, we have seen bloggers arrested, activists tortured, social media monitored and censored just with the sole aim of taming these fearless people trying to give the voiceless a voice. We have others disappearing, their houses raided. Others who are not that lucky, are killed and their bodies dumped. We are only allowed to write poems and love articles that nobody cares to read. Yet we remain proudly Kenyans.

 

5. Corruption is prohibited

In the recent years we have managed to upgrade from a corrupt country to among the most corrupt countries. The national purse turned into a private pocket. People looting like it’s a free shopping. Public resources being misused and mismanaged, yet nothing is being done. Politicians and their relatives masked as looters in chief lurking in the shadows each day planning from which government ministry, department or agency to deep their hands into. For at the end of the day they have the protection of powerful politicians, they are untouchable. Talk of the most corrupt cases that are yet to solved yet like Anglo-leasing, Tokyo Embassy property scam, The National Youth Service scam, The NHIF conspiracy, and many more ranging from the Langa’ta Cemetery scam to the Laptop Tendering scandal, Standard Gauge Tendering scandal to even the Eurobond scam. Government officials and powerful individuals even using public lands to borrow funds or at worse grab them. We are just a scandalling, bribing and scamming nation.

 

6. No tribalism and nepotism is allowed

If there is something worse that can happen to a country is tribalism, judging people based on which tribe they come from, stereotyping, voting based on tribal lines ‘the mtu wetu syndrome’. No one wants to be reminded of the aftermath of the 2007 general election when the fabric of our country, East and Central Africa power house, was torn and nation brought down to its knees. Yet politicians, people elected to represent the people, people who ought to be symbols of national unity are engaging in hate speeches, untouched. Provoking the good people of the country to turn against each other, tribe against tribe, neighbour against neighbour, to chase them from their homes and kill them. Elections in Kenya have gone from democracy rhetorics to tribal endorsements instigating fear to those who won’t abide. Relatives to who is who in the government appointed to public offices and given state commendations.

 

7. Job opportunities are in abundance

Since independence a song has been sung until it has lost its vibe. Every new government that is taking the mantle promising to create jobs for its youth. But instead we have witnessed the level of unemployment sky rocketing. Can’t even start talking about discrimination on tribe and gender in order to secure a job regardless of your qualifications. Asked to offer a bribe in order to get connections to a low paying entry job. Graduates used as pawns for politicians to secure votes.

 

8. The welfare of civil servants is of high priority

By now every Kenyan old enough to spell his/her name has seen the numerous strikes that our country goes through. We have seen teachers striking, nurses, doctors, lecturers simply because the government of the day has failed to honour CBAs they signed. We have seen strikes lasting for days and even months. Civil servants crying of deplorable working conditions that are backed with low salaries. Yet the leaders we elected are busy increasing their salaries day in day out, robbing tax payers and emptying the national coffers. Kenya remains a striking nation.

 

9. High living standards exist

We are in a country that is hit by poor living standards. A country with unequal and poor distribution of income and resources. Some counties and communities have been forgotten, treated like illegal immigrants. Government officials even stealing the funds meant for drought, education or health programmes. The government agencies that are meant to provide oversight and regulate these areas are in the hands of cartels. Hospitals that are understaffed, with no equipments or funds are what the taxpayers wake up to each day. Poor housing and lack of the very basic needs is what the common citizen has to put up with. Funds meant for education being misappropriated and yet we expect our children to have a brighter future. How?

 

10. A government of and for the people is in place

How much I yearn for a responsible government that stands with its people. A government that aims at fulfilling its manifesto and campaign pledges. A government that will put aside the phrase, “it’s our time to eat” and focus of raising the living standards of the people, aiming at creating job opportunities for its youth, better housing, good healthcare, infrastructure that cannot be reckoned with. A government that deep down in its heart knows that education is the key to a brighter future, that its children need better education equipped with modern learning equipments. A government that is focused on growing the economy and advancing the welfare of its people. A government that protects and secures the rights of its citizens at any cost. How much I yearn.

 

The list is long, very long that it can take days to write about. I don’t know whether there is anything to yearn for in this country. Maybe deportation is the only good thing left to long for and maybe the government we all need can be found in Canada or the United Arab Emirates.

 

Please deport me too.

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I’m a literati savant, altruistic, queer laughist, critique from the non-core academia and above all it’s my conviction that in all my papers the rule of three applies.

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3 Comments

3 Comments

  1. Falekz Ombuna

    29th March 2018 at 9:28 am

    Victor Mochere, I want to be deported too

  2. Jonah Lau

    18th June 2018 at 11:13 pm

    This web site is known as a stroll-through for all of the info you needed about this and didn’t know who to ask. Glimpse right here, and also you’ll positively discover it.

  3. Valrie Intermill

    24th June 2018 at 10:31 am

    Independent thinking.

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Opinion

Everyone is (should be) an entrepreneur

Victor Mochere

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Everyone is (should be) an entrepreneur

Entrepreneurs have often been described as people who add value to products or make products with value, either directly or indirectly, and sell them at a profit to customers. While those people who do not impact any value to products they sell are basically ordinary people in business. Therefore all entrepreneurs are business people and not all business people are entrepreneurs.

 

Each individual alive today has a product that they sell to their customers, and that is the human labour either physical or mental.

 

If you are an employee, then your customer is your employer, to whom you are selling your product labour. If you are a student, then your customer is your examiner, to whom you are selling your mental labour. If you are a business owner, then your customer gets the products or services upon which you have spent your labour on. If you are not employed, you still have your product which is your labour, you can choose to either sell it to your potential employer by being employed or use it to create other products or services to sell to your potential customers.

 

The key pillars of entrepreneurship majorly rotate on creativity and innovation, therefore for your labour to be very competitive and to be bought, you must invest in those pillars so as to make it better than that of others.

 

It is a sad tragedy if you don’t think that your labour is a product, or at extreme don’t consider yourself an entrepreneur. It is also a sad reality that most employees lack the entrepreneurship mind-set and prefer rather to remain with employee mentality. Most employed people often think that value creation is the work of their employers, through assigning them specific tasks. That it’s their duty to perform those tasks, and that’s it. They think they don’t need the passion, drive and stigma to create value.

 

Most employees see their current work as a necessity for survival rather than an opportunity to advance themselves through value creation. So they will keep working, day in day out with an anticipation of payment for their labour and if they are not paid, they will resort to industrial action. Others will humble themselves, keep their heads down, perform tasks assigned, follow the routine, and hope that they will get a promotion or salary increment for time served while praying that they don’t get laid off.

 

Think of Steve Jobs, the co-founder of Apple Inc., imagine if he has treated the buyers of Apple products (his customers) as most workers threat their customers (buyers of their labour services). They keep asking and buying Apple II computer, why don’t we focus on producing them. Then he would never have developed the iMac, iPod, iPhone, iPad, etc. The world would never have had better and advanced products, and he would have remained much poorer as a result.

 

There are also the bureaucrats, the non-entrepreneurial bosses. A bureaucratic boss expects the employee to stick to the routine, any deviations would be treated as insubordination, and as needlessly creating extra hassles. Such a boss is receptive to value-adding innovations, and would readily give the employee a bigger role to facilitate and tap into his/her quest to create a lot of innovations. A bureaucratic boss would also know that other entrepreneurial bosses would try to poach the innovative worker’s services given a chance, he/she in a bid to prevent that, would increase the employee’s pay.

 

In pursuit of value creation, an entrepreneurial worker will have to be intelligent and assertive, in doing so will enhance his/her demand in the industry, improve his/her career credentials and ultimately as a result be served with better opportunities in terms of compensation, working conditions, more fulfilling work and life.

 

Shun away from the mentality that you are not an entrepreneur. Every person should have the mindset of self-employment. For those employed your boss is your current customer. For those still in school, your customer is your examiner. For those employed on wage contract, your customer is the market. In any case, whichever path you choose to pursue, you will have to invest heavily on creativity and innovation which in other terms can be perceived as entrepreneurship, the consequences of satisfying your customer being deriving some gain.

 

Only you, are ultimately responsible for your own worth creation, the pay you want and the career path you desire. You are the person and in essence the entrepreneur responsible your own labour producing company called “Me, Ltd.” It’s worth noting that everybody is a potential entrepreneur and entrepreneurship is for everyone.

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Opinion

I need a Kim to my Kanye

Victor Mochere

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I need a Kim to my Kanye

Awhile back, my folks were all over my ass. They wanted an insight, an update, a grapevine if you may, anything that resonates with my love life. They literally made my phone a ‘ticking time bomb’. But am single, and for quite a long time I have been. At that moment it struck me, in a couple of years I will be clocking 30, so I need a Kim to my Kanye.

 

If you are interested in a junk like me. Then you must be tall, short ladies will have to forgive me on this. Be modest, mature and civilized. I don’t like socialites, or at the very least slay queens. I don’t want to be with someone who takes selfies with their tongue out. It’s important that you look presentable. Know how to package yourself. A God fearing lady will be an added advantage. Maybe with a price tag, ‘made in Heaven’. I’m not a church person so you might be forced to drag me to sermons, once in a while. I’m not an anger management consultant, so don’t bother if you are irascible. In a nutshell I need someone who is emotionally strong, and not a wet or green crap.

 

You must be young enough to be a lady and old enough to be a woman. In fact, if you think 23 is old, then you are the right fit. A very loving, caring, patient, tolerable person. Also you must be a very responsible person, hardworking and relatively smart. Which means you should be a logical thinker, intellectually secure and not myopic. A very support woman who is ready to be a wife and a mother. You must not be a drunkard, smoker or do drugs. For crying out loud am trying to start a family. Not unless we’re both drinking, lightly, and we will from time to time.

 

I’m in my mid 20’s. Four months ago I marked my quadranscentennial birthday, so ideally you can guess my age. I’m averagely tall, very dark and arrogantly looking. I do get comments like, ‘ugly’ ‘weird’ ‘trash’ whenever I post a picture of myself on social media. Though I do believe that beauty lies in the eyes of the beholder. Thanks to my mother, am an affable person. Shy but romantic and often attached to sex but I have never dated before.

 

I love movies, music not so much. Sometimes, more so on weekends I might extend into the night watching my favourite TV series, I hope you won’t be bothered by that. I don’t watch soap operas. I’m a fun maker, a joker, thrice I have choked on my jokes. But I will caution you if am making a joke about you. I’m a sound sleeper, so I will appreciate if I get someone who doesn’t snore at night or keep rotating in bed. I do read, but mostly about technology and politics. Once in a while you will find me blogging, that is something that fascinates me.

 

I love eating, and do cooking, though the only person who approves my cooking is my uncle. I might be forced to share your kitchen or displace you entirely, when that happens please bear with me, cooking is one of the very few hobbies that grace my résumé. I don’t like sports, not at all. So if I happen to give you an excuse of going out to watch football, then I must and will certainly be lying. I’m an open person, but that doesn’t mean I don’t keep secrets. My life is a secret itself. I love kids, I hope and pray that we will have ours too, at most four. I have this notorious nephew who usually comes to my house to play video games or watch cartoons, I do give him his space and I will appreciate if you do the same. I have a very strong bond with him that I won’t like to see threatened or jeopardized.

 

I love coffee, very much. In the morning I usually take a cup of coffee with cream while in the evening with lemon and sometimes with ginger. I take shower twice a day, a cold shower in the morning and a hot one before bed. I don’t like riches or poverty, I live a modest life that will be part of you too. I must warn you that I have a killer instinct, more so when it comes to achieving what I want.

 

I don’t prefer a public life though the name ‘bigwig’ has been used on me before. I’m an introvert to some extent, so in case you want to bring some friends over, please have at least one who can initiate a conversation. I don’t smoke or do drugs, the far I have gone is some two or three buffs of a joint. But I do drink occasionally, once every month I go out with my friends to have fun and catch up. I will explain what I mean by fun on our first date. But the good thing is that I usually come home. Sleep overs are only when I have traveled.

 

Before you get too excited. Kindly note that am a nobody, in fact my father once called me a ‘useless baboon’. I don’t know whether he meant it literally or metaphorically. And I must insist that I don’t own much worth calling wealth. But we can start small. Won’t we?

 

If you’re interested or know anyone interested, rush to my inbox IMMEDIATELY!

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Opinion

In Africa, LGBTI is an abomination

Victor Mochere

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In Africa, LGBTI is an abomination

Africa is a third world continent, solely because it has chosen to alienate itself with taboos that are centuries old. As the rest of the world rides along, Africa is limping far behind. Welcome to Africa where people have failed to move with the rest of the world and rather decided to be comfortable with the status quo. LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Intersex), is considered a sin, an abomination to the African moral standards. Engaging in such acts will lead to public ridicule, stigmatization, and jail term or at worse death. The fight for gay rights in most African countries is a suicide mission. Governments have even treated gay groups as radicalized terror groups, advocating for their elimination. With anti-gay religious groups in an effort to gain converts pouring unprecedented resources, making the struggle even more difficult.

 

With the exception of South Africa which has legalized same-sex marriages, other countries have shown a hostile reception to homosexuality activities and apart from Cape Verde which to some extent is considered the most gay friendly country in Africa. Some countries have even outlawed and criminalized LGBTI rights and activities, imposing sanctions, heavy penalties, life imprisonments or death sentences to the culprits. Yet what these so called ‘criminals’ do is to profess love to each other, without harming anyone or affecting the economy. Until March 2018, Kenya was conducting anal examinations, before outlawed by the High Court, on gay people then slapping them with a 14 year jail term. This even though the constitution is silent on homosexuality. The government has invaded the privacy of its citizens and want to control who they love, what they watch and what they say.

 

I remember a while back I made a joke on Twitter.

The responses that followed were harsh and amounted to trolls. With people making assumptions and accusing me of either being gay or being a gay sympathizer. We live in a world where even the mention of the word itself can result to tainting of your name and reputation.

 

When Rafiki, Africa’s first film with an LGBTI theme was first mentioned, people shunned away, castigating it as a poison that will lure their children to immorality. The film was banned in Kenya, the country of its origin, not to be aired or sold in any part of the country. This despite the film taming itself from intimacy scenes and only focusing on professing love. Regardless of its misfortunes, the film became the first Kenyan film to screen at the Cannes Film Festival. But Africa failed to celebrate the artistic impression it portrayed even after getting a standing ovation and positive reviews and reception in other countries. The most ridiculous part being that, a film with no sexual advances can promote gayism. It’s not only shows how primitive Africans are but how a backward thinking syndrome has taken the continent hostage.

 

Coming out in Africa is like digging your own grave. Gay clubs have been raided, homes torched and innocent people stoned to death just because they failed to recognize that, being straight is a default. LGBTI people are forced to linger behind the closed doors and only make love in the cover of darkness. These laws were introduced by the colonial masters, of which UK Prime Minister Theresa May has publicly apologized about. But Africans will later consider LGBTI as a non-issue and work to advance corruption and tribalism as a consolation.

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